For People Crazy About 2D Animation!

Acme Punched! is for people crazy about 2D animation. It may be enjoyed by beginners and others, but it is aimed at animators who know already something about the process of animation and the basics of character animation. In large part, it will attempt to provide a deep look into the problem solving that goes on in my head as I work out a scene, often in step-by-step posts that I will sometimes enter in "real time", without knowing in advance what the outcome will be. Mistakes and false starts will not only be included but emphasized, so that the creative process of animation will be portrayed realistically. And, while my own bias is for 2D drawn animation, many of the effects and principles discussed here can apply to CGI 3D animation as well. I hope the blog will prove useful and instructive for all.

-Jim Bradrick

Tuesday, January 24, 2017

No. 119, Maquette, Part 3

The Character Maquette Realized

Finally tore myself away from feverish storyboarding on Carry On to finish this maquette.

Somewhat imperfect in its fine details, it is completely usable now for its purpose--to show me any angle I desire of this character.

It has been baked (275°f for 1/2 hour) so now instead of having clay-like malleability, it is hard like a soft stone and can be sanded or carved.  I may do some sanding just to smooth it out, but as it is only a drawing aid and not for public display, it is basically finished.

I could also paint it if I wanted to, preferably using flat acrylics, but I doubt that I will go that far.

I can now even see that one extreme angle that got me started, looking up at him from below his chin.

To see earlier stages of the sculpting, see post No. 118.


  1. Congrats!, and… will you do the old man?

    1. No, with the Old Man, I seem to be able to draw him however I want him. In fact, I think making a maquette of him might be limiting since I am already using a lot of "cheats" in his design--meaning that sometimes my views of him are abstract--they do not actually conform to a literal three dimensional model. For example, in profile I show his eyeglass lenses to be still a broad oval, rather the edge view that a maquette might dictate. Maybe I will do a post about this.

  2. This comment has been removed by the author.

  3. This is truly a great read for me. I have bookmarked it and I am looking forward to reading new articles. Keep up the good work!.
    Tech Startups

    1. Thanks, Robert. To my own amazement, I don't seem to be running out of things to write about, so stay with me!